Potential student research projects

The Research School of Physics performs research at the cutting edge of a wide range of disciplines.

By undertaking your own research project at ANU you could open up an exciting career in science.

Filter projects

Some other physics related research projects may be found at the ANU College of Engineering & Computer Science, the Mathematical Sciences Institute and the Research School of Astronomy & Astrophysics

Physics of the Nucleus

Creating new superheavy elements

The discovery of new elements is of fundamental importance in progressing our society – new elements have contributed human history toward an affluent society. This project aims at proposing the best way to create new superheavy elements based on our studies, and at creating new superheavy elements with the best way. 

Dr Taiki Tanaka, Professor David Hinde, Professor Mahananda Dasgupta

Nuclear spectroscopy with nucleon transfer reactions

Contribute to the development of a new experimental research program at the ANU Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility and investigate the internal structure of atomic nuclei with nucleon transfer reactions. Interested students will have the opportunity to undertake research projects in nuclear instrumentation, software development and fundamental physics. 

Dr AJ Mitchell, Professor Gregory Lane, Professor Andrew Stuchbery, Dr Tibor Kibedi

High precision electron spectroscopy of electric monopole transitions

The project is aiming to develop a high resolution conversion electron spectrometer to study electric monopole transitions in atomic nuclei. 

Mr Jackson Dowie, Dr Tibor Kibedi, Professor Andrew Stuchbery

Nuclear moments and intense hyperfine fields in ferromagnetic media

This project evaluates data at the interface of nuclear, atomic and solid-state physics with a view to discovering new physics and providing reliable data on the magnetic moments of short-lived nuclear quantum states. It assists the International Atomic Energy Agency to provide reliable nuclear data for research and applications.

Professor Andrew Stuchbery, Mr Timothy Gray, Mr Ben Coombes, Mr Brendan McCormick

Directional Dark Matter Measurements with CYGNUS

This project will develop an R&D prototype particle detector as part of the CYGNUS dark matter collaboration

Dr Lindsey Bignell, Professor Gregory Lane, Professor Andrew Stuchbery

Nuclear lifetimes - developing new apparatus and methods

The measurement of the lifetimes of excited nuclear states is foundational for understanding nuclear excitations. This project covers three measurement methods that together span the nuclear lifetime range from about 100 femtoseconds to many nanoseconds. The project can include equipment development, measurement, and the development of analysis methodology (programming and computation). 

Professor Andrew Stuchbery, Dr Tibor Kibedi, Professor Gregory Lane, Mr Ben Coombes

Particle detection with exotic scintillators for nuclear structure research

Compact particle detectors using exotic, new scintillator materials and silicon photomultipliers are being developed for varied roles in our nuclear structure research program.

Professor Gregory Lane, Professor Andrew Stuchbery, Dr AJ Mitchell, Dr Tibor Kibedi

Latest challenges in nuclear fission theory

This project aims to study nuclear fission in both analytical and numerical ways to understand the mechanisms responsible for the diversified and astonishing fission properties in the actinide and sub-lead regions.

Dr Remi Bernard, Dr Cedric Simenel

Nuclear isomers for energy storage and fundamental physics

Investigate the internal structure of atomic nuclei by constructing the spectrum of excited states using time-correlated, gamma-ray coincidence spectroscopy.

Dr AJ Mitchell, Professor Gregory Lane, Professor Andrew Stuchbery, Dr Tibor Kibedi

The SABRE Dark Matter Experiment

Multiple projects are available to support the SABRE dark matter particle experiment. These include local experiments at ANU, computer simulations to predict backgrounds and the overall experimental sensitivity, data acquisition system development and analysis of the SABRE measurement data.

Dr Lindsey Bignell, Professor Gregory Lane, Professor Andrew Stuchbery, Ms Yiyi Zhong

How to create new super-heavy elements

Superheavy elements can only be created in the laboratory by the fusion of two massive nuclei. Our measurements give the clearest information on the characteristics and timescales of quasifission, the major competitor to fusion in these reactions.

Professor David Hinde, Dr Kaushik Banerjee, Dr Cedric Simenel

Measuring and modelling free-ion hyperfine fields

Motivated by exciting prospects for measurements of the magnetism of rare isotopes produced by the new radioactive beam accelerators internationally, this experimental and computational project seeks to understand the enormous magnetic fields produced at the nucleus of highly charged ions by their atomic electron configuration.

Professor Andrew Stuchbery, Dr Tibor Kibedi, Mr Brendan McCormick

Nuclear models in nuclear structure and reactions

Nuclei are complex quantum systems and thus require advanced modelling to understand their structure properties. This project uses such models to interpret experimental data taken at the ANU and at overseas nuclear facilities.

Dr Edward Simpson, Professor Andrew Stuchbery, Dr Cedric Simenel

Theory of nuclear fission

Heavy atomic nuclei may fission in lighter fragments, releasing a large amount of energy which is used in reactors. Advanced models of many-body quantum dynamics are developed and used to describe this process.

Dr Cedric Simenel, Dr Remi Bernard

Nuclear magnetism - magnetic moment measurements

This project builds on our established track record of developing novel methods to measure magnetic moments of picosecond-lived excited states in atomic nuclei, and the theoretical interpretation of those measurements. Students will help establish new methodologies to underpin future international research at the world's leading radioactive beam laboratories.
 

Professor Andrew Stuchbery, Dr Tibor Kibedi, Professor Gregory Lane, Mr Brendan McCormick

Updated:  23 July 2020/ Responsible Officer:  Director, RSPhys/ Page Contact:  Physics Webmaster