QuintessenceLabs wins global award

Tuesday 24 November 2015

A high-technology company started by physicists from The Research School of Physics and Engineering has won a major international award for its quantum cyber-security technology.

QuintessenceLabs was named one of the top emerging innovation companies by the global Security Innovation Network (SINET), which includes the US Department of Homeland Security and the Home Office in the United Kingdom.

QuintessenceLabs was formed as a commercial venture at ANU in 2008 by quantum physics graduates. The company continues close collaborations with the ANU Department of Quantum Science, and works closely with the banking and government sectors to help safeguard organisations from cyber attacks.

"The company is succeeding because they are maintaining close contact with researchers working on the cutting edge of quantum networks," said Professor Ping Koy Lam from the ANU Quantum Optics group.

The partnership is working towards a global quantum security network that is unbreakable.

"This recognition highlights the importance of quantum cyber security in addressing some of today's critical data security issues, and shielding against tomorrow's increasingly sophisticated threats," said QuintessenceLabs Founder and CEO Dr Vikram Sharma.

Since leaving their start-up premises at ANU in 2014, the company has attracted investment from Westpac and some high-wealth investors. It already has an office in the United States and has announced plans for further overseas expansion.

ANU Pro Vice-Chancellor of Innovation and Advancement, Professor Mick Cardew-Hall, said QuintessenceLabs was an example of how universities can work to help build the industries of the future.

"QuintessenceLabs shows the practical, real-life and commercial benefits that can flow from high-level research and partnerships between universities and business," Professor Cardew-Hall said.

Dr Sharma said QuintessenceLabs has presented its latest technology at key SINET summits in Washington DC, and will present it in London in 2016.

Related news stories

The Australian National University (ANU) will play a key role in shaping Australia’s next-generation technology, according to a new roadmap for the emerging quantum industry launched by the CSIRO today.  The roadmap recognises ANU as a leading example across quantum research, education and commercialisation. Dr...
The Australian National University (ANU) will play a key role in shaping Australia’s next-generation technology, according to a new roadmap...
A report released today reveals that the photonics industry in Australia and New Zealand has grown remarkably in recent years and is now a significant contributor to the economy. Lighting Economic Growth: Photonics in Australia and New Zealand estimates the local photonics industry comprises over 500 companies...
A report released today reveals that the photonics industry in Australia and New Zealand has grown remarkably in recent years and is now a significant...
Quantum encryption offers unbreakable codes, but don’t get your encoding equipment from Dr Michael Hall. He’s discovered exactly how to hide code-breaking information in a quantum-encryption system. And he can hide it even more effectively if time flows backwards. His latest study has shown...
Quantum encryption offers unbreakable codes, but don’t get your encoding equipment from Dr Michael Hall. He’s discovered exactly...
ANU researchers have created a crack-proof encryption system that’s got the nod from NASA. TEGAN DOLSTRA reports. Your bank account details and medical records might be safe from prying eyes now, but who might be able to hack your secrets in 5, 20 or 50 years’ time? In the digital age,...
ANU researchers have created a crack-proof encryption system that’s got the nod from NASA. TEGAN DOLSTRA reports. Your bank account details...

Updated:  15 January 2019/ Responsible Officer:  Director, RSPhys/ Page Contact:  Physics Webmaster