ANU Tall Poppies the pick of the bunch

Friday 19 August 2011

Three ANU researchers have won 2011 ACT Young Tall Poppy Science Awards.

Dr Cormac Corr, Dr Gonzalo Estillo and Dr Liana Leach were named at a ceremony held on 17 August.

Dr Corr from the Research School of Physics and Engineering was rewarded for his work on plasma – the fourth state of matter – to improve engineering, technology and clean energy applications. Plasma plays a critical role in advanced technologies such as TV-displays, mobile phones, solar-cells and biomedicine. Plasma also has great potential to provide electrical power through fusion energy, with negligible CO2 emissions.

The Young Tall Poppy Science Awards recognise the achievements of outstanding young researchers in the sciences including technology, engineering, mathematics and medical research.

» read more

Related news stories

Faster space manoeuvres and safer, more sustainable, propellants may soon be possible thanks to a new three-year partnership between The Australian National University and French propulsion company ThrustMe. Led by the ANU Research School of Physics, the joint research program will explore how electrothermal...
Faster space manoeuvres and safer, more sustainable, propellants may soon be possible thanks to a new three-year partnership between The Australian...
Leading nanotechnology and physics researcher, Distinguished Professor Chennupati Jagadish, will be the next president of the Australian Academy of Science. He is the first Australian of Indian descent to take up the role and will commence in May 2022. The Australian Academy of Science is one of the nation’s...
Leading nanotechnology and physics researcher, Distinguished Professor Chennupati Jagadish, will be the next president of the Australian Academy...
ANU is poised to provide China with its first Stellarator device, which enables experimental research on magnetically confined plasma that is vital for developing fusion energy. It's part of a transition within the Australian Plasma Fusion Research Facility at ANU to support Australian efforts to work...
ANU is poised to provide China with its first Stellarator device, which enables experimental research on magnetically confined plasma that is vital...
A thin layer of metal foil could be the key to making green hydrogen production from solar energy a commercial reality. A team led by scientists at the ANU Research School of Physics used nickel-based foils to create robust, cheap and efficient water splitting cells driven by solar energy. “This...
A thin layer of metal foil could be the key to making green hydrogen production from solar energy a commercial reality. A team led by scientists...

Updated:  11 August 2022/ Responsible Officer:  Director, RSPhys/ Page Contact:  Physics Webmaster