Establishment of The ANU Centre for Gravitational Astrophysics (CGA)

Monday 20 January 2020

ANU Centre for Gravitational Astrophysics (CGA) kicked off Jan 1st, 2020. The Centre is established jointly under RSPhys and RSAA and aims to advance the science and technology of gravitational wave astrophysics and to build a world-leading role for ANU in this field.

The gravitational wave scientists of ANU have already largely contributed to detection of gravitational wave sources, first of which took place in 2015. The new centre brings together the ongoing research at RSPhys and RSAA and will pave the way for Australia to host a node of the global gravitational wave network in future.

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Updated:  15 January 2019/ Responsible Officer:  Director, RSPhys/ Page Contact:  Physics Webmaster