ANU launches virtual tour of lab searching for traces of exploded stars

Thursday 21 December 2017

The Australian National University (ANU) has launched an online virtual tour of its Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility, which is searching for traces of exploded stars, known as supernovae, in the ocean.

ANU physicist Dr Ed Simpson said the tour included 360-degree photos that allow visitors to explore every angle of the lab, with short video interviews with physics students and staff.

“The facility is helping to study how to make new elements in the periodic table, develop innovative medical imaging technology and search through sediment from the ocean floor for traces of exploded stars,” said Dr Simpson from the ANU Research School of Physics and Engineering.

“We hope students, local residents and anyone with a bit of curiosity about science will get a real buzz out of taking the tour. Everyone’s invited.”

The Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility uses electricity and magnets to speed particles up to extreme energies to study their internal make-up, and how they behave when they collide.

Highlights of the online tour include the 15-million-volt terminal at the heart of the 47-metre tall accelerator tower and the superconducting booster accelerator.

The ANU Research School of Physics and Engineering hosts the Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility.

The tour can be found at https://physics.anu.edu.au/tour/

» read more

Related news stories

New research involving The Australian National University (ANU) has, for the first time, demonstrated a long-theorised nuclear effect, in a feat that will help scientists understand how stars evolve and produce elements such as gold and platinum. Physicists first predicted the effect, called Nuclear...
New research involving The Australian National University (ANU) has, for the first time, demonstrated a long-theorised nuclear effect, in a feat...
Last week Professor Christine Charles hosted the first Australian-Japanese workshop on making micro-satellites with the view to exploring Pocket Rocket activities, as well as CubeSat and Ground Station tracking facilities. This was a pilot workshop. One of the primary aims is to develop ANU as a training...
Last week Professor Christine Charles hosted the first Australian-Japanese workshop on making micro-satellites with the view to exploring Pocket...
In August 2017 several members of the Research School of Physics and Engineering represented the School at the Joint Colleges of Science 3MT final, where they were challenged to present their thesis in an entertaining way, in under three minutes and with a single powerpoint slide. Over the last few months...
In August 2017 several members of the Research School of Physics and Engineering represented the School at the Joint Colleges of Science 3MT final,...
In August 2017 several members of the Research School of Physics and Engineering represented the School at the Joint Colleges of Science 3MT final, where they were challenged to present their thesis in an entertaining way, in under three minutes and with a single powerpoint slide. Over the next few weeks...
In August 2017 several members of the Research School of Physics and Engineering represented the School at the Joint Colleges of Science 3MT final,...

Updated:  15 January 2019/ Responsible Officer:  Director, RSPE/ Page Contact:  Physics Webmaster