ANU launches virtual tour of lab searching for traces of exploded stars

Thursday 21 December 2017

The Australian National University (ANU) has launched an online virtual tour of its Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility, which is searching for traces of exploded stars, known as supernovae, in the ocean.

ANU physicist Dr Ed Simpson said the tour included 360-degree photos that allow visitors to explore every angle of the lab, with short video interviews with physics students and staff.

“The facility is helping to study how to make new elements in the periodic table, develop innovative medical imaging technology and search through sediment from the ocean floor for traces of exploded stars,” said Dr Simpson from the ANU Research School of Physics and Engineering.

“We hope students, local residents and anyone with a bit of curiosity about science will get a real buzz out of taking the tour. Everyone’s invited.”

The Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility uses electricity and magnets to speed particles up to extreme energies to study their internal make-up, and how they behave when they collide.

Highlights of the online tour include the 15-million-volt terminal at the heart of the 47-metre tall accelerator tower and the superconducting booster accelerator.

The ANU Research School of Physics and Engineering hosts the Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility.

The tour can be found at https://physics.anu.edu.au/tour/

» read more

Related news stories

The first-ever discovery of rare plutonium-244 on earth has scientists rethinking the origins of the elements on our planet. The tiny traces of radioactive plutonium-244 were found in ocean crust alongside radioactive iron-60. The two isotopes are evidence of violent cosmic events in the vicinity of earth...
The first-ever discovery of rare plutonium-244 on earth has scientists rethinking the origins of the elements on our planet. The tiny traces...
A mystery surrounding the space around our solar system is unfolding thanks to evidence of  supernovae found in deep-sea sediments. Professor Anton Wallner, a nuclear physicist at ANU Research School of Physics, led the study which shows the Earth has been travelling for the last 33,000 years through...
A mystery surrounding the space around our solar system is unfolding thanks to evidence of  supernovae found in deep-sea sediments. Professor...
A passion for helping fellow students has earned RSPE's Lauren Bezzina a college-wide award, the Janet Elspeth Crawford award for postgraduate leadership. Lauren, a PhD student in Nuclear Physics at the Research School of Physics, has been recognised for her initiative in setting up a student mentoring...
A passion for helping fellow students has earned RSPE's Lauren Bezzina a college-wide award, the Janet Elspeth Crawford award for postgraduate...
Australia’s spacecraft and satellites will better survive damaging radiation and extreme conditions thanks to a $2.5 million grant, for space science to be led by the Australian National University (ANU).  The grant creates a national network of space testing facilities and brings Australia...
Australia’s spacecraft and satellites will better survive damaging radiation and extreme conditions thanks to a $2.5 million grant, for space...

Updated:  24 July 2021/ Responsible Officer:  Director, RSPhys/ Page Contact:  Physics Webmaster